17 Oct

View the pictures of CLM Learners at Stuarts Draft High School in Pennsylvania

The staff is doing an awesome, awesome job —– and two of their learners were Homecoming 2017 Prince and Princess!

Their homecoming float won!!!!

Thanks to Kristan Zaccaria for sending me this information and photos. She is such a GREAT Certified CLM Coordinator and Coach. In addition, to being a BCBA.

Princess and Prince of Homecoming 2017 at Stuart Draft High School in Pennsylvania.
2 May

What’s the difference between Tucci Learning Solutions and the CLM?

There is a big difference!  Our company implements CLM programming.  Here is a graphic that helps explain the difference.

We implement CLM programming, not TUCCi programming just like the other implementations around the world. 

Did you know that Tucci Learning Solutions and the CLM can be found in a variety of places in social media?

 

You can follow us on:

Facebook   (CLM)

Twitter    (CLM with some information for local CLMers)

Tumblr   (Tucci Learning Solutions)

Google+   (CLM)

Pinterest  (All kind of information about the CLM, TUCCi and Early Start)

Instagram  (in progress)

 

Check out these other great online resources:

CLM Blog

Competent Learner Model website

Tucci Learning Solutions website

eLearning Store   (Tucci Learning Solutions)

 

Got something great to share about your experience(s) with TUCCi and the CLM?  Please email Rocio ([email protected]) to share the good news through social media. 

Thanks, everyone.   Hope to see you online!

Rae-Ann Arevalo

Director of Staff Development | CLM Certified Coach

28 Mar

CLM Success Stories!

If you are interested in viewing the possible outcomes of CLM Programming, watch the video, Case Studies.

The Pennsylvania Department of Education produced the following video to document the effects of the CLM. An observer is provided with an opportunity to view how 8 naive learners acquire the competencies to perform successfully in their learning environments (school, home, and community) over the course of a year. Each Case Study illustrates the benefits to each learner and his/her instructors who are implementing the CLM. Parents, Teachers, Para-professionals, and Administrators talk about how the CLM has positively impacted their learners and their learning environments.

28 Mar

Save the Date – Competent Learner Model Conference

Coach and Administrator Pre-Conference Institute Keynote: Protecting and Sustaining CLM Implementation—Why Evidence is Not Enough: Lessons Learned from Direct Instruction, Dr. Cathy Watkins.
Day 1: CLM Inspired Implementation Innovations: What’s New & What’s Next – CLM ICE credential, CLM Coaching Process and Certification, CLM Licensing, CLM Certificate Programs, CLM Training Labs, CLMMIS, Fluency FlashCards, Teaching Machine
Dr. Cathy Scutta, Vicci Tucci.
Day 2 Keynote: Innovations in Learning: Moving Towards Personalization, Dr. Janet Twyman.

3 Feb

Congratulations!

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Please help acknowledge Maribel Castillo, BCBA  for submitting a total of 6 ISPCs during the month of January.

This valuable coaching tool is very beneficial for our staff in developing skilled CLM implementers.

Special thanks to the direct service staff who collaboratively completed the ISPCs with Maribel.  Much appreciation to Vanessa Avalos, Christian Cardenas, Mayra Meneses, Ivette Olvera Flores, Jaclyn Pickering and Frank Rameriz.

Kudos to Jen Woolfoot, BCBA and Mayra MenesesBelinda Goodwin and Roxana Virgen as well as Liz Hernandez and Flora Yu for submitting ISPCs in January.

Looking forward to seeing many more ISPCs being submitted during the month of February.  Want to be included in February ‘s ISPC shout out?  Simply participate in completing an ISPC with your Coach, Coordinator or BCBA.  A section or the complete ISPC can be filled out, depending on the staff’s completion of the Course of Study and experience.   A PDF version of the ISPC is attached.

Thanks for all that you are continuing to do for your learners.

Rae-Ann Arevalo

 

Director Of Staff Development

CLM Certified Coach

Tucci Learning Solutions

6 Hangar Way Suite A
Watsonville, CA 95076

Mobile:  (408) 315-7353   Fax: (831)786-0644    

Office Hours:  Tuesday-Thursday 8:00 am-4:00 pm 
 
ISPC
17 Jan

“The Competent Learner Model: The Merging of Applied Behavior Analysis, Direct Instruction, and Precision Teaching”

Shonnet Brand, BCBA and Certified CLM Coach and Coordinator, made me a very happy “camper” this morning. She shared with me that a student she is supervising at Nova Southeastern University first assigned reading this semester is, “The Competent Learner Model: The Merging of Applied Behavior Analysis, Direct Instruction, and Precision Teaching”. Her course is being taught by David Nevel.

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17 Jan

CONGRATULATIONS!!!!

Please join me in congratulating, the first university-based Cohort to complete the CLM Coordinator Certificate Program.

These ladies completed a 12 credit program designed to support competencies in managing large scale CLM Implementations. These ladies stuck together for almost three years, across multiple time zones, their own work and personal pressures, and a pause in their coursework due to my unexpected stroke. They committed to learning and growing together, showed genuine vulnerability in their bravery to push themselves and each other outside of their comfort zones and expand their understanding of the importance of this work to assure that learners from around the globe will experience the benefits of the CLM program.

The CLM Coordinator Certificate courses provide the foundations to apply competencies in leadership, organizational change, implementation science and project design and management to the implementation of the Competent Learner Model and other evidence-based instructional methods.

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20 Dec

Million dollar gift establishes endowed directorship and support fund for WVU Nursery School

Any Behavior Analysts and Direct Instruction Professionals, who is interested in Early Childhood Education, should visit the West Virgina University Nursery School in Morgantown, W.VA. Anonymous donors just donated a $1,000,000 to support this nursery school. Please click the link below to read the article.

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Working on puzzles in the WVU Nursery

 

22 Aug

YES WE DID IT!!!! THE KEYS OF OUR NEW EISA CLM ITALY’S OFFICE GIVEN BY THE MAYOR OF PALERMO MR. ORLANDO, GRAZIE MILLE!!!

So excited for my CLM Colleagues in Palermo…

“The CLM Parents in Palermo, Sicily continue to be supported by their government officials to implement the Competent Learner Model. Khaty Costumati is one of those parents. She is the Regional Associate for Tucci Learning Solutions and a Certified CLM Coach. She along with other parents continue to seek this support! Much Respect and Appreciation, Vicci Tucci”.

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http://palermo.repubblica.it/cronaca/2016/08/10/news/palermo_il_comune_assegna_una_villetta_ai_ragazzi_autistici_abbiamo_vinto_una_battaglia_-145752081/

29 Jun

Behavioral therapy covered by insurance now available

By Lacey Peterson / The Union Democrat

Families with children in need of behavioral therapy can now access help that will be covered by insurance, including Medi-Cal.

Deena Garman, of Soulsbyville, and Florencia Baldwin, of Twain Harte, are behavioral analysts and work for Tucci Learning Solutions out of Monterey, which is now accepting referrals for families who need help for their children from toddlers to transitional adults.

In 2012, SB 946 started requiring health care service plan contracts and health insurance policies to provide coverage for behavioral health treatment for people with autism or other pervasive developmental disorders.

Parents can call their insurance companies, Valley Mountain Regional Center at (209) 473-0951 or Tucci at (831) 786-0600 to start the process of getting services for their children approved, then Garman and Baldwin can make appointments with the family. Visits will begin later this summer.

Garman has a master’s degree in behavioral analysis, and Baldwin is in progress on hers. Both have worked with children with autism spectrum disorders and other behavioral issues, and both formerly worked in child welfare services.

They use what’s called ABA, or applied behavioral analysis, for therapy. It’s the only research-based model for autism, Garman said.

Part of the therapy includes play-based activities, where children learn social and communication skills through play and interaction.

The model is based on “play, learn, achieve,” Garman said.

Maggie Beck / Union Democrat / Deena Garman, of Soulsbyville (left), and Florencia Baldwin, of Twain Harte, will do in-home behavioral therapy for Tuolumne County families.

Using things like wooden puzzles, textured balls, string-bead activities and more, children develop motor skills, learn about interacting with others, and develop the language skills needed to socialize with peers, family and teachers.

Garman and Baldwin help the children listen effectively and respond appropriately to various social interactions.

Early motor skills are also taught.

By learning core behaviors, the door is opened up for social opportunities for the children, Garman explained.

For example, a child with limited language skills may throw a tantrum when it’s time to transition from one activity to another at school or home, because they can’t express that they want to do whatever activity they’re doing for another minute, the way a child without those challenges would be able to.

Difficulty transitioning between activities is a common issue among children with ASD.

Before now, in-home support for families affected by autism or other behavioral issues has been limited.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 1 in 68 children have ASD.

Statistically, that’s more than 200 children in Tuolumne County, Garman said.

These services are hoped to fill a service gap. The idea is to help children in their natural home setting, so they can first be successful there, then work outward to be successful in school and community settings.

The pair can also help in school or community settings, like if a transitional adult needs help learning to grocery shop, for example, or if a child has trouble in certain school-based situations, Garman said.

The pair has expertise in behavior issues like communication deficits, self-injurious behavior, eating issues, social-skill deficits and property destruction.

One of the goals of behavioral therapy is to create socially meaningful outcomes for children and families, Garman said.

Behavioral issues can often prevent families from going on social outings, and behavioral therapy can help, Baldwin said.

Like, if you can’t go to the park because the child can’t listen and runs into the road, she said.

The length of treatment depends on the child’s needs, and the behavior analysts send progress reports to insurance providers, who approve length of treatment.

Parent training is also part of the model.

Original article can be found at http://www.uniondemocrat.com/newsroomstafflist/4422966-151/behavioral-therapy-covered-by-insurance-now-available

22 Jul

2014 Summer CLM Academy

by Rae-Ann Arevalo

This summer has been busy with CLM trainings that focused on strengthening instructional delivery, shaping behavioral vocabulary and learning how to clearly explain the CLM by using every day examples.Thank you Vicci Tucci and my fellow colleagues for helping make the trainings happen. Check out this summer’s CLM Summer Academy Stars from the Monterey, CA region. Looking forward having the training in San Jose, CA next.

Summer Academy Stars

Here are some of the comments that were posted to the Competent Learner Model (CLM) Facebook Page:

Vicci Tucci – “I was so impressed with the participants and instructors when I sat in for just a few minutes of the last CLM Academy this week. I am soooooooooo proud, appreciative, and respectful of all of you!!! Love ya, Vicci”

Kathy Yates Joy – “Great job everyone!”

A group visual project made by the participants at the CLM trainings for the Monterey, CA region at this summer's training.
A group visual project made by the participants at the CLM trainings for the Monterey, CA region at this summer’s training.

photo

2 Jun

Competent Learner Model Conference

CLMers from around the world will be speaking at the PA CLM Conference on June 18, 2014 (e.g., Sicily, Abu Dhabi, Paris, and USA: VA, PA, and CA).

Register VERY soon to attend the PA CLM Conference online or in person on June 18th. By doing so, you can learn about an ABA practice called Generativity; “…the study of conditions that occasion novel behavior and complex behavior ‘for free’.” (Dr. Kent Johnson, 2008). Dr. Janet Twyman will also be speaking about this topic.

final clm con flyer
31 Dec

CLM Academy UAE

Here is a photo of the CLM Academy that was held in UAE in December. Nipa Bhuptani delivered this CLM Academy.

Please welcome our UAE colleagues to our CLM Learning Community!

Back row, from left to right: Jane, Parisa khan, Nipa Bhuptani, Kavitha, Ayesha, Rizwana, and Ibrahim Gamal. Front row, from left to right:  Richanda, Teresa, Hadeel and Paula.
Back row, from left to right:
Jane, Parisa khan, Nipa Bhuptani, Kavitha, Ayesha, Rizwana, and Ibrahim Gamal.
Front row, from left to right:
Richanda, Teresa, Hadeel and Paula.

 

26 Sep

Large Scope and Sequence Chart for Pre-1 Lessons 1-16

Our Large Scope and Sequence Chart for Pre-1 Lessons 1-16 is now available in our website’s corner.

Please take a minute to visit us there. Your coaches’ CID # and password will be required.

http://www.tuccionline.com/staff_corner/coaches_login.php

scope and sequence 1 scope and sequence 2 scope and sequence 3

We also want to take a minute to thank Jennifer Laurito from The Vista School, and her talented group of coaches from PA, for helping us update this very important document, as well as Karrie Hatfield from Tucci Learning Solutions.

They dedicated their effort, time, and knowledge, over the summer to make sure that the Large Scope and Sequence Chart for Pre-1 Lessons 1-16 includes all the updates made to the first 8 lessons.

Thanks CLM Team for all your help and dedication.

12 Aug

EARLY START SERVICES

For Children with Special Needs Birth through 36 months

 

Learning through Doing

with

Caring & Knowledgeable Professionals

Services for PARENTS and CHILDREN

3. Early Start Services

  • Individualized, direct one to one services.
  • Parent/Caregiver training that meets the needs of the child.
  • Development of skills that are necessary for the child’s success in school and later in life.

PARENTS/CAREGIVER TRAINING

Parent and/or Caregiver training programs are individually designed to address the specific needs of the infant or toddler. These needs are identified through parent surveys and interviews paired with assessments completed by the professional members of the team.

Parents or caregivers are an essential part of the Early Start Program team and have an active role in developing their child’s individual learning, behavior or therapy plans.

Parents or caregivers are assured that they will be able to use the relevant techniques and strategies determined to be effective for their child.

EARLY START TEAM PROFESSIONALS

Licensed & Certified:

Early Childhood Specialists

Speech Pathologists

Occupational Therapists

Behavior Specialists

Board Certified Behavior Analysts

Licensed Marriage& Family Therapists 

These specialists along with parents evaluate the child’s functioning level in five developmental areas:

  • Physical development
  • Communication
  • Cognitive
  • Adaptive/Self-help
  • Social/Emotional development

In addition to their formal training, all Early Start team members provided through TUCCI Learning Solutions, have received training in behavior analysis. Behavior analysis is the basis for designing and implementing effective learning, behavior and therapy plans.

REFERRAL for SERVICES

Children may be referred by their family physicians, pediatricians, parents, public health nurses, the child’s local school district, or other agencies, such as the San Andreas Regional Center or community service groups.

2. Early Start Services

LOCATION of SERVICES

All services are provided within a child’s natural environment such as the home, neighborhood park, playground, or community pre-school setting.

FUNDING RESOURCES

  • Tucci Learning Solutions Inc., is vendorized through the San Andreas Regional Center
  • Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc., is an in-network Provider for most majosr Insurance companies
  • Medi-Cal
  • Private Pay (e.g., Parents)

5. Early Start Services

TUCCI LEARNING SOLUTIONS, INC.

Watsonville, CA 95076

Office: (831) 786-0600

Fax: (831) 786-0644

Email: [email protected]

17 Jun

The Competent Learner Model (CLM)

The Competent Learner Model (CLM) is a multi-component, research validated, instructional package containing solutions for solving the major problems faced by educators and parents of children with autism and other significant learning challenges.

The Problems

We know that educators and parents struggle with making important, meaningful progress with the increasing numbers of learners who have autism and other significant learning challenges…sometimes they don’t know where or how to begin.

We know that multidisciplinary professionals working to achieve results for learners with autism and other significant learning challenges often do not work together….they may have competing goals and use  instructional methodologies that contradict each other’s work.

We know that even if teams learn how to implement evidence validated instructional practices, sustaining those practices is often problematic.

The CLM implementation tools provide the replicable steps needed to learn, utilize, extend and innovate with research validated instructional practices.

The CLM Solutions

The CLM Learner Assessments provide the tool needed for Teams to quickly understand the learners’ strengths and challenges and formulate an intervention plan.

The CLM Curriculum provides a tool of carefully organized scope and sequence of skills. This curriculum provides the tool needed for Teams to know what to teach and how to teach it.

The CLM Staff Training and coaching components provide tools needed for teams to speak a common language, agree on a basic methodology and work collaboratively together to achieve important meaningful progress for learners.

Why Act Now

Not only is it our job to educate learners with autism and other significant learning challenges, it is the moral imperative of our time to provide research validated instructional practices that will have the most momentous impact on their lives…every learner has the civil right to be taught skills that will have great utility throughout their lives.

The CLM is the only multi-component package that has the solutions you need to achieve important and meaningful progress for all learners..

What’s Needed to Implement CLM

  • A Team that wants to learn research validated instructional practices.
  • Administrative and parental leadership supporting collaboration and change.
  • A certified CLM Coach.

CLM Implementation Tools

The CLM Implementation tools provide the replicable steps needed to learn, utilize, extend, and innovate with research validated instructional practices.

Course of Study for Instructors

 

 

  Curriculum for Learners

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funding Options 

  • Vendorized through San Andreas Regional Center
  • TUCCi is an in-network provider for most major insurers
  • School districts/programs in California (i.e., Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, and Los Angeles counties), Paris, and across Pennsylvania, and Virginia
  • Private pay

“The Competent Learner Model, which came to the school in January 2012, helps students with cognitive, physical, developmental and medical disabilities develop skills that not only foster academic success, but also success in daily life.” 

Kim Walter (VA Reporter) 2013

 
Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.
6 Hangar Way, Suite A
Watsonville, CA 95076
(831) 786-0600
www.tuccionline.com
www.competentlearnermodel.com
[email protected]
10 Jun

Preparing for life after school

New Teaching Method Helps Students In Real World

Stonewall Jackson High School special education teacher Julie Whitaker, center, looks over the shoulder of student Garrett Lloyd, 15, of Edinburg, while his mother Sheila, right, looks on during class on Tuesday. Garrett has had much success over the school’s implementation of the Competent Learner Model this past school year. Rich Cooley/Daily

 

By Kim Walter

QUICKSBURG – When Julie Neese-Whitaker first met 15-year-old Garrett Lloyd, she realized that he struggled with basic communication and often got so frustrated that he wound up in a ball on the floor.

That behavior wasn’t necessarily new to the Stonewall Jackson High School resource teacher — she had worked with adults and students with multiple challenges for several years.

Now, the recently implemented Competent Learner Model helps Garrett sit happily in his classroom, participating and working toward small goals.

That has Whitaker very excited.

Garrett has Down syndrome and was diagnosed with autism at age 6. He’s been in the Shenandoah County school system his entire life, but has shown more progress in the past year than ever before.

“I think before we would get frustrated, and so would the kids,” Whitaker said in her special education classroom Tuesday afternoon. “But now we have real things to work toward and we know that sometimes it’s better to just stop and take a break.”

The Competent Learner Model, which came to the school in January 2012, helps students with cognitive, physical, developmental and medical disabilities develop skills that not only foster academic success, but also success in daily life.

The model focuses on seven repertoires – talking, listening, observing, reading, problem solving, writing and participating — which impact day to day functional actions.

Teachers undergo intensive training and continuing professional development to keep up with the curriculum and lessons used to move a student through the model.

Students are assessed during the model’s implementation so their teacher knows what part of the curriculum to start with. Whitaker said the flexibility of the curriculum is helpful, as some students are able to make it through a lesson a month, while others move at a much slower pace.

Within each lesson are a number of activities teachers can use to test the growth of a student — the more a student increases in lesson level, the more core repertoires he or she is required to exemplify. Before graduating to the next lesson, a student has to be assessed to prove they’re ready.

Teachers also are equipped with binders of materials and a CLM coach, who ensures successful implementation in the classroom and conducts performance reviews to determine if the educators are meeting pre-established criteria for each unit.

Whitaker credits her CLM coach, Shonnet Brand, with being there “every step of the way,” offering different teaching techniques and activity options. However, Brand said being a coach has taught her a lot in return.

“I work with behavioral analysis, so the education piece of this was very interesting to me,” she said. “These teachers do more than a lot of people imagine.”

Brand said basic subject matter like science, math, and social studies is part of the model, but the main goal is helping students become independent parts of their community.

“Of course things like SOLs are important, but there are so many other skills that these students need to master before leaving school,” she said. “With the model, teachers have ways to incorporate a bit of everything.”

Over the past year, Whitaker has seen so much improvement in Garrett that she presented on his progress during the Shenandoah Valley Regional Program’s CLM meeting in April. It included four other school divisions around Shenandoah County.

“Because of the way assessments are done, we have a visual way of tracking student success,” Whitaker said. “I think that’s what really made me realize that this works. I can look at Garrett’s sheet and see where he needs help, but I can also see how far he’s come.”

Sheila Lloyd, Garrett’s mother, said middle school was particularly tough for her son as he began to withdraw. She said it became normal for her to get about five phone calls a week, if not more, about Garrett refusing to participate or do work in class.

“It was very frustrating because I didn’t see the same struggles at home,” she said. “And then I get calls asking me to help calm him down or persuade him to do work, and I didn’t really know what to say.”

Through the model, Whitaker learned that Garrett did better with several small goals throughout the day so that he was more motivated to continuously do work. He also responded quickly to visual reminders of his daily schedule.

When Lloyd found out her son had done so well with the CLM in just one year, she said she couldn’t help but cry.

“Look at him, he’s happy,” she said as she watched Garrett complete a worksheet with virtually no supervision. “If this is what he can do in a year, I can’t even imagine what he’ll learn during the rest of high school.”

The CLM also is being used in several middle and elementary schools in Shenandoah County. Whitaker said she feels it’s the best thing for local students with multiple disabilities.

“My kids have progressed so much already, so imagine where they would be if they had started on the CLM back in elementary school,” she said. “Honestly, I had my doubts when we started, but this is what we should’ve been doing all along.”

Contact staff writer Kim Walter at 540-465-5137 ext. 191, or [email protected]